Brunswick County 4-H

4-H is a community of young people across America who are learning leadership, citizenship & life skills.

Planning a Trip to NCSU? January 19, 2011

Filed under: 4-H,4-H Centennial — Blair Green @ 10:29 am

I am pleased to announce the opening of “4-H and NCSU: Leading Together” a DH Hill Library Exhibit. The exhibit celebrates the 100 year partnership of 4-H, the North Carolina Cooperative Extension Service, the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, North Carolina A&T State University and North Carolina State University.  It is designed as the capstone for our three year celebration of We Are 4-H: The North Carolina 4-H Centennial.

Please plan to visit the exhibit anytime during the next six months. We hope you enjoy your visit.
Marshall Stewart, Ed.D
Associate Director, NC Cooperative Extension Service
Head and State Program Leader
Department of 4-H Youth Development and Family & Consumer Sciences

 

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State Council Conference: We Are 4-H: Past, Present, & Future November 23, 2009

Representing Brunswick County at the State Council Conference

 

 

Six Brunswick County 4-Hers attended the annual 4-H State Council Conference for youth ages 13-19 in Raleigh, NC.  This year’s theme was “We Are 4-H: Past, Present, and Future” and the conference focused on how 4-H has changed from its beginnings, where it is today and where it will head in the future.  The workshops focused on careers and entrepreneurship as well as leadership, citizenship and team building workshops.  Our county delegates completed several requirements of the 4-H Ambassador program.  The mission of the North Carolina 4-H Ambassador program is to empower teen 4-H leaders with the knowledge, skills, and aspirations necessary to be effective advocates for NC 4-H Youth Development.  Participants were Perry Grosch, 17 of Oak Island; Janzen Jones, 13 of Southport; Samantha Lawrence, 14 of Southport, Kendrick Morgan, 17 of Supply; Bryan Simmons, 16 of Supply; and Justin Simmons, 17 of Supply.

 

Youth in Brunswick County Learn and Lead on Alternative Energy October 8, 2009

4h-NSE-logoOn October 7, youth in Brunswick County joined hundreds of thousands of young people around the nation to simultaneously create biofuel. As part of 4-H National Youth Science DayTM, youth participated in Biofuel Blast, the 2009 National Science Experiment. This year’s experiment taught youth how cellulose and sugars in plants – such as corn, switchgrass, sorghum and algae – can be converted into fuel and how alternative energies can be used in their own communities.

To combat a national shortage of young people pursuing science college majors and careers, 4-H National Youth Science Day sparks an early youth interest in science and science education. Currently, more than five million youth across the nation take part in 4-H science, engineering and technology year-long programming. Through the One Million New Scientists, One Million New IdeasTM campaign, 4-H has undertaken a bold goal to engage one million new young people in science, engineering and technology programs by the year 2013.

In fact, according to a longitudinal study by Tufts University, youth who participate in 4-H are more likely to get better grades in school, to seek out science classes, to see themselves going to college, and to contribute positively in their communities. In addition, 4-H youth have been shown to better resist peer pressure and are less likely to engage in risky behaviors.

“Engaging youth early in scientific exploration has been shown to spark a lasting interest in the sciences,” said Blair Green, 4-H Extension Agent. “Science can often seem intimidating to young people, but 4-H National Youth Science Day makes science fun, real, and accessible. Kids will learn about cutting edge technologies and then take the next step to lead by applying what they’ve learned in their very own community.”

As part of the Cooperative Extension System of the United States Department of Agriculture implemented by the nation’s 106 land-grant colleges and universities, 4-H has been educating youth in the sciences for over 100 years. In fact, the land-grant colleges and universities have been deeply involved in biofuel research for some time and will showcase their work to inspire youth on 4-H National Youth Science Day.

4-H’s robust and university research-based science curriculum, combined with new initiatives like 4-H National Youth Science Day, will arm youth with the necessary technical skills to help America maintain its competitive edge in the global marketplace.

NYSD 2009

About 4-H National Youth Science Day

4-H National Youth Science Day takes place every year during National 4-H Week (October 4th through the 10th). In 2008, 4-H National Youth Science Day kicked off its inaugural year by partnering with Steve Spangler to showcase Helpful Hydrogels – an experiment that uses scientific principles to teach youth across the nation about water conservation. Youth from every state in the nation tested the effectiveness of water absorbing polymers in an easy-to-administer soil and water experiment followed by sharing their results online and engaging youth around the country in a dialogue about important environmental issues.

This year’s national science experiment – Biofuel Blast – was developed in conjunction with the University of Wisconsin-Madison Extension and Wisconsin 4-H with generous sponsor support provided by John Deere and DuPont. For more information on 4-H National Youth Science Day, please visit www.4-H.org/NYSD.

 

Brunswick County Celebrates 100 Years of 4-H

Brunswick County 4-H celebrated 100 years of 4-H in North Carolina on October 5th, 2009.  The night was packed full of activities, including a Favorite Foods Fair, a 4-H themed Cake Decorating Contest, entertainment, and a time capsule dedication.  Many honors were given including a thanks to volunteer leaders for all of their time and dedication to the program, to Farm Bureau for their continual support of 4-H, to Mr. & Mrs. Earp for donating the use of their farm for the past 20 years for our Life on the Farm 3rd grade school enrichment program, and to the past Brunswick County 4-H professionals in attendance.  Thanks was also given to Harris Teeter, Food Lion, Hills, Walmart, and Lowe’s for their donations.  Entertainment was provided by Amber & Rosie Yurgel with a 4-H Cheer and by Samantha Lawrence sining “We Are 4-H.”

Centennial Celebration

 

4-Hers Put Hands to Larger Service September 28, 2009

Filed under: 4-H,4-H Centennial — Blair Green @ 3:45 pm
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Planning in conjunction with Brunswick County’s Fall Clean Up Week, twenty-three 4-H youth and parent volunteers joined together on Oak Island Beach on Saturday, September 19th to set their “hands to larger service” by helping to clean the environment and beautify the beach.  4-H agent, Blair Green, remembers one parent telling her that they figured the beach would be fairly clean and at first look it seemed okay, but it’s amazing what kind of trash they found when they actually started looking for it. Trash bags in hand, it was a great example to see young people involved in their community and the youth admitted they felt a sense of pride for their efforts when they completed the cleanup project. 

Centennial Beach Cleanup at OKI 2009-09-19

 

 

Make Your Own Centennial T-Shirt! May 11, 2009

Filed under: 4-H,4-H Centennial — Blair Green @ 8:50 am
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Join us on Friday June 5th at the Extension Office to make your own 4-H Centennial T-Shirt!  The cost is only $10 which includes all supplies, including your t-shirt!  The shirts will be green with a white design.  You must be 13 years old to participate in the workshop.  But don’t worry- if you are 12 or under you can still get a shirt!  Just place your order with the size of t-shirt you want with $10 and you can pick up your shirt one week later on Friday June 12th.

Sign-up by Wednesday June 3rd!!

The stencil for the shirts is being made from the design submitted by the winner of the T-Shirt Contest, who will be announced at the Summer Fun Kick-off on May 28th 5:30-6:30pm.